Emitt Rhodes Death Dead – American Singer and Instrumentalist Emitt Rhodes Obituary: Cause of Death

Michael Roff Death

Emitt Rhodes Death Dead – American Singer and Instrumentalist Emitt Rhodes Obituary: Cause of Death

“Sad to hear of the passing of Emitt Rhodes…for those not hip to his music, his early solo albums from the early 70’s could’ve easily passed as McCartney solo album…he was a bit of a one-man Beatles and those albums are absolutely pop essentials #RIPEmittRhodes”

“It’s with great sadness to say the great Emitt Rhodes has passed away. He was the mastermind of one greatest albums ever in my book and he recorded the whole thing by himself. So sad! Hoped I might meet him someday”

Emitt Lynn Rhodes (February 25, 1950 – July 19, 2020) was an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and recording engineer. Rhodes began his career in musical ensembles The Palace Guard as the group’s drummer before joining The Merry-Go-Round as a multi-instrumentalist.

The Merry-Go-Round had a recording contract with A&M Records when the group disbanded in 1969. Rhodes recorded songs at A&M to fulfill that contract, but A&M decided to not release them at the time. Rhodes then decided to go out on his own and bought equipment to make a recording studio in his parents’ garage. Rhodes recorded his first album (Emitt Rhodes) in that home studio. He got a recording contract with ABC/Dunhill Records, which released his album as well as the next two albums he recorded (Mirror and Farewell to Paradise). Rhodes got a $5,000 advance for Emitt Rhodes, which he spent on recording equipment.[citation needed]

His first album was a critical success – Billboard called Rhodes “one of the finest artists on the music scene today” and later called his first album one of the “best albums of the decade”. The album reached number 29 on the Billboard charts. The single “Fresh as a Daisy” reached number 54 on the pop chart. Rhodes opened at the Troubadour nightclub on February 9, 1971, concurrent with a large earthquake that struck the Los Angeles area. An ad that ran in Billboard said “That wasn’t an earthquake, that was Emitt Rhodes opening at the Troubadour!” Meanwhile, shortly after Emitt Rhodes was released by Dunhill, A&M decided to release their old recordings of The American Dream, which confused record buyers. Mirror was released in 1971 and did reach the top 200 on Billboard’s album chart. In 1973 Dunhill released Rhodes’ final album, Farewell to Paradise.

Rhodes wrote all of the songs on his albums. On Emitt Rhodes, Mirror, and Farewell to Paradise, he played all of the instruments and sang all of the vocals while recording himself in his home recording studio. He used a four-track recorder for the instruments for Emitt Rhodes and transferred those to an eight-track recorder to add the vocals. He used an eight-track recorder for Mirror and Farewell to Paradise. The mixdown engineer on Farewell to Paradise was Curt Boettcher, the producer and musician who is best remembered for his work on the “soft pop” albums by Sagittarius and The Millennium.[citation needed]

Rhodes’ contract with Dunhill called for an album every six months (six albums over three years) – a schedule that was impossible for Rhodes to meet, due to writing all of the songs and recording each instrument and vocal individually by himself. Dunhill sued Rhodes for $250,000 and withheld royalties because of his failure to deliver albums on the timescale required by the contract. Emitt Rhodes took nearly a year to record, the album Mirror took nine months, and Farewell to Paradise took over a year.

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