Injury curtails Manchester United youngster’s season

NAIJANEWSVIBES

The creation of the European Super League has dominated the football narrative since first breaking late on Sunday night.

Whether or not the 12 teams that effectively wish to break away from UEFA are ultimately successful, it’s clear that the football landscape is changing again.

We shouldn’t be surprised.

Things haven’t been the same in England for example since 1992 and the creation of the Premier League.

Nor in European football generally once it became clear that an entire country, Qatar in the case of Paris Saint-Germain, could hoover up clubs as they saw fit.

Both PSG and Manchester City arguably have a huge advantage over the other teams competing in their respective leagues, without even taking the ESL into account.

What’s interesting is the likes of Ander Herrera coming out to poo-poo the advent of the ESL, when they had absolutely no problem whatsoever moving to a club owned by a country who have a dubious human rights record to be polite about it.

Why did he move there? Certainly not for ambition as might be claimed. Or for the ‘competitive football.’ He would’ve had both at Manchester United.

If he’s worried about the ‘rich stealing what the people created,’ then maybe he would agree to cap his salary or redirect a fair chunk of his earnings to those lower down the pyramid.

Money talks and it always has. More so over the last couple of decades.

So how is what the ESL propose any different to a player moving to the highest bidder, regardless of how well equipped they are for success?